Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

all honour. That the issue of this fray should in no way affect any 

cause pleaded in Courts ecclesiastical or civil, by the lady who 

asserted herself to be the Marchioness of Morella, or by the most noble 

Marquis of Morella, whom she claimed as her husband. 

 

These conditions having been read, the champions were asked if they 

assented to them, whereon each of them answered, "Aye!" in a clear 

voice. Then the herald, speaking on behalf of Sir Peter Brome, by 

creation a knight of St. Iago and a Don of Spain, solemnly challenged 

the noble Marquis of Morella to single combat to the death, in that he, 

the said marquis, had aspersed the name of his relative, the English 

lady, Elizabeth Dene, who claimed to be his wife, duly united to him in 

holy wedlock, and for sundry other causes and injuries worked towards 

him, the said Sir Peter Brome, and his wife, Dame Margaret Brome, and in 

token thereof, threw down a gauntlet, which gauntlet the Marquis of 

Morella lifted upon the point of his lance and cast over his shoulder, 

thus accepting the challenge. 

 

Now the combatants dropped their visors, which heretofore had been 

raised, and their squires, coming forward, examined the fastenings of 

their armour, their weapons, and the girths and bridles of their 

horses. These being pronounced sound and good, pursuivants took the 

steeds by the bridles and led them to the far ends of the lists. At a 

signal from the king a single clarion blew, whereon the pursuivants 

loosed their hold of the bridles and sprang back. Another clarion blew, 

and the knights gathered up their reins, settled their shields, and set 

their lances in rest, bending forward over their horses' necks. 

 

An intense silence fell upon all the watching multitude as that of night 

upon the sea, and in the midst of it the third clarion blew--to Margaret 

it sounded like the trump of doom. From twelve thousand throats one 

great sigh went up, like the sigh of wind upon the sea, and ere it died 

away, from either end of the arena, like arrows from the bow, like 

levens from a cloud, the champions started forth, their stallions 

gathering speed at every stride. Look, they met! Fair on each shield 

struck a lance, and backward reeled their holders. The keen points 

glanced aside or up, and the knights, recovering themselves, rushed past 

each other, shaken but unhurt. At the ends of the lists the squires 

caught the horses by the bridles and turned them. The first course 

was run. 


Page 7 from 12:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6  [7]  8   9   10   11   12   Forward