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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER XXV 

 

HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA

 

 

It was night. Peter, faint with loss of blood and stiff with bruises, 

had bade his farewell to their Majesties of Spain, who spoke many soft 

words to him, calling him the Flower of Knighthood, and offering him 

high place and rank if he would abide in their service. But he thanked 

them and said No, for in Spain he had suffered too much to dwell there. 

So they kissed his bride, the fair Margaret, who clung to her wounded 

husband like ivy to an oak, and would not be separated from him, even 

for a moment, that husband whom living she had scarcely hoped to clasp 

again. Yes, they kissed her, and the queen threw about her a chain from 

her own neck as a parting gift, and wished her joy of so gallant a lord. 

 

"Alas! your Majesty," said Margaret, her dark eyes filling with tears, 

"how can I be joyous, who must think of to-morrow?" 

 

Thereon Isabella set her face and answered: 

 

"Dona Margaret Brome, be thankful for what to-day has brought you, and 

forget to-morrow and that which it must justly take away. Go now, and 

God be with you both!" 

 

So they went, the little knot of English sailormen, who, wrapped in 

Spanish cloaks, had sat together in the amphitheatre and groaned when 

the Eagle struck, and cheered when the Falcon swooped, leading, or 

rather carrying Peter under cover of the falling night to a boat not far 

from this Place of Bulls. In this they embarked unobserved, for the 

multitude, and even Peter's own squires believed that he had returned 

with his wife to the palace, as he had given out that he would do. So 

they were rowed to the _Margaret_, which straightway made as though she 

were about to sail, and indeed dropped a little way down stream. Here 

she anchored again, just round a bend of the river, and lay there for 

the night. 

 

It was a heavy night, and in it there was no place for love or lovers' 

tenderness. How could there be between these two, who for so long had 

been tormented by doubts and fears, and on this day had endured such 

extremity of terror and such agony of joy? Peter's wound also was deep 

and wide, though his shield had broken the weight of Morella's sword, 

and its edge had caught upon his shoulder-piece, so that by good chance 

it had not reached down to the arteries, or shorn into the bone; yet he 

had lost much blood, and Smith, the captain, who was a better surgeon 

than might have been guessed from his thick hands, found it needful to 

wash out the cut with spirit that gave much pain, and to stitch it up 


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