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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

flat foot on the deck and said that he, who commanded there, would 

suffer no such thing. A wounded man, he declared, would but cumber them 

who had little room to spare in that small boat, and could be of no 

service, either on land or water. Moreover, Master Peter's face was 

known to thousands who had watched it yesterday, and would certainly be 

recognised, whereas none would take note at such a time of a dozen 

common sailors landed from some ship to see the show. Lastly, he would 

do best to stop on board the vessel, where, if anything went wrong, they 

must be short-handed enough, who, if they could, ought to get her away 

to sea and across it with all speed. 

 

Still Peter would have gone, till Margaret, throwing her arms about him, 

asked him if he thought that she would be the better if she lost both 

her father and her husband, as, if things miscarried, well might happen. 

Then, being in pain and very weak, he yielded, and Smith, having given 

his last directions to the mate, and shaken Peter and Margaret by the 

hand, asking their prayers for all of them, descended with his twelve 

men into the boat, and dropping down under shelter of the hulks, rowed 

to the shore as though they came from some other vessel. Now the quay 

was not more than a bowshot from them, and from a certain spot upon the 

_Margaret_ there was a good view of it between the stern of one hulk and 

the bow of another. Here, then, Peter and Margaret sat themselves down 

behind the bulwark, and watched with fears such as cannot be told, while 

a sharp-eyed seaman climbed to the crow's-nest on the mast, whence he 

could see over much of the city, and even the old Moorish castle that 

was then the Holy House of the Inquisition. Presently this man reported 

that the procession had started, for he saw its banners and the people 

crowding to the windows and to the roof-tops; also the cathedral bell 

began to toll slowly. Then came a long, long wait, during which their 

little knot of sailors, wearing the Spanish cloaks, appeared upon the 

quay and mingled with the few folk that were gathered there, since the 

most of the people were collected by thousands on the great _plaza_ or 

in the adjacent streets. 

 

At length, just as the cathedral clock struck eight, the "triumphant" 

march, as it was called, began to appear upon the quay. First came a 

body of soldiers with lances; then a crucifix, borne by a priest and 

veiled in black crape; then a number of other priests, clad in 


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