Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"Dirty as a Thames mud-bank at low tide. Clever woman, Isabella. No one 

else would have thought of making a man ridiculous as she did by Morella 

when she gave his life to Betty, and promised and vowed on his behalf 

that he would acknowledge her as his lady. No fear of any trouble from 

him after that, in the way of plots for the Crown, or things of that 

sort. Why, he must have been the laughing-stock of the whole land--and 

a laughing-stock never does anything. You remember the Spanish saying, 

'King's swords cut and priests' fires burn, but street-songs kill 

quickest!' I should like to learn more of what has become of them all, 

though, wouldn't you, Master? Except Bernaldez, of course, for he's been 

safe in Paris these many years, and doing well there, they say." 

 

"Yes," answered Castell, with a little smile--"that is, unless I had to 

go to Spain to find out." 

 

Just then the three children came running up, bursting through the gate 

all together. 

 

"Mind my flower-bed, you little rogues," shouted Captain Smith, shaking 

his stick at them, whereat they got behind him and made faces. 

 

"Where's the squirrel, Peter?" asked Castell. 

 

"We hunted it out of the tree, Grandad, and right across the grass, and 

got round it by the edge of the brook, and then--" 

 

"Then what? Did you catch it?" 

 

"No, Grandad, for when we thought we had it sure, it jumped into the 

water and swam away." 

 

"Other people in a fix have done that before," said Castell, laughing, 

and bethinking him of a certain river quay. 

 

"It wasn't fair," cried the boy indignantly. "Squirrels shouldn't swim, 

and if I can catch it I will put it in a cage." 

 

"I think that squirrel will stop in the woods for the rest of its life, 

Peter." 

 

"Grandad!--Grandad!" called out the youngest child from the gate, 

whither she had wandered, being weary of the tale of the squirrel, 

"there are a lot of people coming down the road on horses, such fine 

people. Come and see." 

 

This news excited the curiosity of the old gentlemen, for not many fine 

people came to Dedham. At any rate both of them rose, somewhat stiffly, 

and walked to the gate to look. Yes, the child was right, for there, 

sure enough, about two hundred yards away, advanced an imposing 

cavalcade. In front of it, mounted on a fine horse, sat a still finer 

lady, a very large and handsome lady, dressed in black silks, and 

wearing a black lace veil that hung from her head. At her side was 


Page 2 from 6:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   Forward