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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

Margaret's eyes and Peter's long nose. How are they?" she added 

anxiously. 

 

"You will see for yourself in a minute or two. Come, send on your people 

and baggage to the Hall, though where they will stow them all I don't 

know, and walk with us." 

 

Betty hesitated, for she had been calculating upon the effect of a 

triumphal entry in full state. But at that moment there appeared 

Margaret and Peter themselves--Margaret, a beautiful matron with a child 

in her arms, running, and Peter, looking much as he had always been, 

spare, long of limb, stern but for the kindly eyes, striding away 

behind, and after him sundry servants and the little girl Margaret. 

 

Then there arose a veritable babel of tongues, punctuated by embracings; 

but in the end the retinue and the baggage were got off up the drive, 

followed by the children and the little Spanish-looking boy, with whom 

they had already made friends, leaving only Betty and her closely 

muffled-up attendant. This attendant Peter contemplated for a while, as 

though there were something familiar to him in her general air. 

 

Apparently she observed his interest, for as though by accident she 

moved some of the wrappings that hid her face, revealing a single soft 

and lustrous eye and a few square inches of olive-coloured cheek. Then 

Peter knew her at once. 

 

"How are you, Inez?" he said, stretching out his hand with a smile, for 

really he was delighted to see her. 

 

"As well as a poor wanderer in a strange and very damp country can be, 

Don Peter," she answered in her languorous voice, "and certainly 

somewhat the better for seeing an old friend whom last she met in a 

certain baker's shop. Do you remember?" 

 

"Remember!" answered Peter. "It is not a thing I am likely to forget. 

Inez, what became of Fray Henriques? I have heard several 

different stories." 

 

"One never can be sure," she answered as she uncovered her smiling red 

lips; "there are so many dungeons in that old Moorish Holy House, and 

elsewhere, that it is impossible to keep count of their occupants, 

however good your information. All I know is that he got into trouble 

over that business, poor man. Suspicions arose about his conduct in the 

procession which the captain here will recall," and she pointed to 

Smith. "Also, it is very dangerous for men in such positions to visit 

Jewish quarters and to write incautious letters--no, not the one you 

think of; I kept faith--but others, afterwards, begging for it back 

again, some of which miscarried." 


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