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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"Is he dead then?" asked Peter. 

 

"Worse, I think," she answered--"a living death, the 'Punishment of the 

Wall.'" 

 

"Poor wretch!" said Peter, with a shudder. 

 

"Yes," remarked Inez reflectively, "few doctors like their own 

medicine." 

 

"I say, Inez," said Peter, nodding his head towards Betty, "that marquis 

isn't coming here, is he?" 

 

"In the spirit, perhaps, Don Peter, not otherwise." 

 

"So he is really dead? What killed him?" 

 

"Laughter, I think, or, rather, being laughed at. He got quite well of 

the hurts you gave him, and then, of course, he had to keep the queen's 

gage, and take the most noble lady yonder, late Betty, as his 

marchioness. He couldn't do less, after she beat you off him with your 

own sword and nursed him back to life. But he never heard the last of 

it. They made songs about him in the streets, and would ask him how his 

godmother, Isabella, was, because she had promised and vowed on his 

behalf; also, whether the marchioness had broken any lances for his sake 

lately, and so forth." 

 

"Poor man!" said Peter again, in tones of the deepest sympathy. "A cruel 

fate; I should have done better to kill him." 

 

"Much; but don't say so to the noble Betty, who thinks that he had a 

very happy married life under her protecting care. Really, he ate his 

heart out till even I, who hated him, was sorry. Think of it! One of the 

proudest men in Spain, and the most gallant, a nephew of the king, a 

pillar of the Church, his sovereigns' plenipotentiary to the Moors, and 

on secret matters--the common mock of the vulgar, yes, and of the 

great too!" 

 

"The great! Which of them?" 

 

"Nearly all, for the queen set the fashion--I wonder why she hated him 

so?" Inez added, looking shrewdly at Peter; then without waiting for an 

answer, went on: "She did it very cleverly, by always making the most of 

the most honourable Betty in public, calling her near to her, talking 

with her, admiring her English beauty, and so forth, and what her 

Majesty did, everybody else did, until my exalted mistress nearly went 

off her head, so full was she of pride and glory. As for the marquis, he 

fell ill, and after the taking of Granada went to live there quietly. 

Betty went with him, for she was a good wife, and saved lots of money. 

She buried him a year ago, for he died slow, and gave him one of the 

finest tombs in Spain--it isn't finished yet. That is all the story. Now 

she has brought her boy, the young marquis, to England for a year or 


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