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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

wealth, what said the wise king of my people?--that ofttimes riches make 

themselves wings and fly away. Moreover, man, I have learned to love and 

honour you, and sooner would I leave my only child in your hands than in 

those of any lord in England." 

 

"I know not what to say," broke in Peter. 

 

"Then say nothing. It is your custom, and a good one--only listen. Just 

now you spoke of your Essex lands in the fair Vale of Dedham as gone. 

Well, they have come back, for last month I bought them all, and more, 

at a price larger than I wished to give because others sought them, and 

but this day I have paid in gold and taken delivery of the title. It is 

made out in your name, Peter Brome, and whether you marry my daughter, 

or whether you marry her not, yours they shall be when I am gone, since 

I promised my dead wife to befriend you, and as a child she lived there 

in your Hall." 

 

Now moved out of his calm, the young man sprang from his seat, and, 

after the pious fashion of the time, addressed his patron saint, on 

whose feast-day he was born. 

 

"Saint Peter, I thank thee--" 

 

"I asked you to be silent," interrupted Castell, breaking him short. 

"Moreover, after God, it is one John who should be thanked, not St. 

Peter, who has no more to do with these lands than Father Abraham or the 

patient Job. Well, thanks or no thanks, those estates are yours, though 

I had not meant to tell you of them yet. But now I have something to 

propose to you. Say, first, does Margaret think aught of that wooden 

face and those shut lips of yours?" 

 

"How can I know? I have never asked her; you forbade me." 

 

"Pshaw! Living in one house as you do, at your age I would have known 

all there was to know on such a matter, and yet kept my word. But there, 

the blood is different, and you are somewhat over-honest for a lover. 

Was she frightened for you, now, when that knave made at you with 

the sword?" 

 

Peter considered the question, then answered: 

 

"I know not. I did not look to see; I looked at the Scotchman with his 

sword, for if I had not, I should have been dead, not he. But she was 

certainly frightened when the fellow caught hold of her, for then she 

called for me loud enough." 

 

"And what is that? What woman in London would not call for such a one as 

Peter Brome in her trouble? Well, you must ask her, and that soon, if 

you can find the words. Take a lesson from that Spanish don, and scrape 

and bow and flatter and tell stories of the war and turn verses to her 


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