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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

eyes and hair. Oh, Peter! are you a fool, that I at my age should have 

to teach you how to court a woman?" 

 

"Mayhap, Sir. At least I can do none of these things, and poesy wearies 

me to read, much more to write. But I can ask a question and take 

an answer." 

 

Castell shook his head impatiently. 

 

"Ask the question, man, if you will, but never take the answer if it is 

against you. Wait rather, and ask it again--" 

 

"And," went on Peter without noticing, his grey eyes lighting with a 

sudden fire, "if need be, I can break that fine Spaniard's bones as 

though he were a twig." 

 

"Ah!" said Castell, "perhaps you will be called upon to make your words 

good before all is done. For my part, I think his bones will take some 

breaking. Well, ask in your own way--only ask and let me hear the answer 

before to-morrow night. Now it grows late, and I have still something to 

say. I am in danger here. My wealth is noised abroad, and many covet it, 

some in high places, I think. Peter, it is in my mind to have done with 

all this trading, and to withdraw me to spend my old age where none will 

take any notice of me, down at that Hall of yours in Dedham, if you will 

give me lodging. Indeed for a year and more, ever since you spoke to me 

on the subject of Margaret, I have been calling in my moneys from Spain 

and England, and placing them out at safe interest in small sums, or 

buying jewels with them, or lending them to other merchants whom I 

trust, and who will not rob me or mine. Peter, you have worked well for 

me, but you are no chapman; it is not in your blood. Therefore, since 

there is enough for all of us and more, I shall pass this business and 

its goodwill over to others, to be managed in their name, but on shares, 

and if it please God we will keep next Yule at Dedham." 

 

As he spoke the door at the far end of the hall opened, and through it 

came that serving-man who had been bidden to follow the Spaniard. 

 

"Well," said Castell, "what tidings?" 

 

The man bowed and said: 

 

"I followed the Don as you bade me to his lodging, which I reached 

without his seeing me, though from time to time he stopped to look about 

him. He rests near the palace of Westminster, in the same big house 

where dwells the ambassador de Ayala, and those who stood round lifted 

their bonnets to him. 

 

"Watching I saw some of these go to a tavern, a low place that is open 

all night, and, following them there, called for a drink and listened to 


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