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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

their talk, who know the Spanish tongue well, having worked for five 

years in your worship's house at Seville. They spoke of the fray 

to-night, and said that if they could catch that long-legged fellow, 

meaning Master Brome yonder, they would put a knife into him, since he 

had shamed them by killing the Scotch knave, who was their officer and 

the best swordsman in their company, with a staff, and then setting his 

British bulldogs on them. I fell into talk with them, saying that I was 

an English sailor from Spain, which they were too drunk to question, and 

asked who might be the tall don who had interfered in the fray before 

the king came. They told me he is a rich senor named d'Aguilar, but ill 

to serve in Lent because he is so strict a churchman, although not 

strict in other matters. I answered that to me he looked like a great 

noble, whereon one of them said that I was right, that there was no 

blood in Spain higher than his, but unfortunately, there was a bend in 

its stream, also an inkpot had been upset into it." 

 

"What does that mean?" asked Peter. 

 

"It is a Spanish saying," answered Castell, "which signifies that a man 

is born illegitimate, and has Moorish blood in his veins." 

 

"Then I asked what he was doing here, and the man answered that I had 

best put that question to the Holy Father and to the Queen of Spain. 

Lastly, after I had given the soldier another cup, I asked where the don 

lived, and whether he had any other name. He replied that he lived at 

Granada for the most part, and that if I called on him there I should 

see some pretty ladies and other nice things. As for his name, it was 

the Marquis of Nichel. I said that meant Marquis of Nothing, whereon the 

soldier answered that I seemed very curious, and that was just what he 

meant to tell me--nothing. Also he called to his comrades that he 

believed I was a spy, so I thought it time to be going, as they were 

drunk enough to do me a mischief." 

 

"Good," said Castell. "You are watchman tonight, Thomas, are you not? 

See that all doors are barred so that we may sleep without fear of 

Spanish thieves. Rest you well, Peter. Nay, I do not come yet; I have 

letters to send to Spain by the ship which sails to-morrow night." 

 

When Peter had gone, John Castell extinguished all the lamps save one. 

This he took in his hand and passed from the hall into an apartment that 

in old days, when this was a noble's house, had been the private chapel. 


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