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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

There was an altar in it, and over the altar a crucifix. For a few 

moments Castell knelt before the altar, for even now, at dead of night, 

how knew he what eyes might watch him? Then he rose and, lamp in hand, 

glided behind it, lifted some tapestry, and pressed a spring in the 

panelling beneath. It opened, revealing a small secret chamber built in 

the thickness of the wall and without windows; a mere cupboard that once 

perhaps had been a place where a priest might robe or keep the 

sacred vessels. 

 

In this chamber was a plain oak table on which stood candles and an ark 

of wood, also some rolls of parchment. Before this table he knelt down, 

and put up earnest prayers to the God of Abraham, for, although his 

father had caused him to be baptized into the Christian Church as a 

child, John Castell remained a Jew. For this good reason, then, he was 

so much afraid, knowing that, although his daughter and Peter knew 

nothing of his secret, there were others who did, and that were it 

revealed ruin and perhaps death would be his portion and that of his 

house, since in those days there was no greater crime than to adore God 

otherwise than Holy Church allowed. Yet for many years he had taken the 

risk, and worshipped on as his fathers did before him. 

 

His prayer finished, he left the place, closing the spring-door behind 

him, and passed to his office, where he sat till the morning light, 

first writing a letter to his correspondent at Seville, and then 

painfully translating it into cipher by aid of a secret key. His task 

done, and the cipher letter sealed and directed, he burned the draft, 

extinguished his lamp, and, going to the window, watched the rising of 

the sun. In the garden beneath blackbirds sang, and the pale primroses 

were abloom. 

 

"I wonder," he said aloud, "whether when those flowers come again I 

shall live to see them. Almost I feel as though the rope were tightening 

about my throat at last; it came upon me while that accursed Spaniard 

crossed himself at my table. Well, so be it; I will hide the truth while 

I can, but if they catch me I'll not deny it. The money is safe, most of 

it; my wealth they shall never get, and now I will make my daughter safe 

also, as with Peter she must be. I would I had not put it off so long; 

but I hankered after a great marriage for her, which, being a Christian, 

she well might make. I'll mend that fault; before to-morrow's morn she 

shall be plighted to him, and before May-day his wife. God of my 


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