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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

you won't, there will be no need for you to go, for I shall go and 

trouble you no more. You know what I am, and all about me, and I have 

nothing more to say except that, although you may find many finer 

husbands, you won't find one who would love and care for you better. I 

know that you are very beautiful and very rich, while I am neither one 

nor the other, and often I have wished to Heaven that you were not so 

beautiful, for sometimes that brings trouble on women who are honest and 

only have one heart to give, or so rich either. But thus things are, and 

I cannot change them, and, however poor my chance of hitting the dove, I 

determined to shoot my bolt and make way for the next archer. Is there 

any chance at all, Margaret? Tell me, and put me out of pain, for I am 

not good at so much talking." 

 

Now Margaret began to grow disturbed; her wayward assurance departed 

from her. 

 

"It is not fitting," she murmured, "and I do not wish--I will speak to 

my father; he shall give you your answer." 

 

"No need to trouble him, Margaret. He has given it already. His great 

desire is that we should marry, for he seeks to leave this trade and to 

live with us in the Vale of Dedham, in Essex, where he has bought back 

my father's land." 

 

"You are full of strange tidings this morning, Peter." 

 

"Yes, Margaret, our wheel of life that went so slow turns fast enough 

to-day, for God above has laid His whip upon the horses of our Fate, 

and they begin to gallop, whither I know not. Must they run side by 

side, or separate? It is for you to say." 

 

"Peter," she said, "will you not give me a little time?" 

 

"Aye, Margaret, ten whole minutes by the clock, and then if it is nay, 

all your life, for I pack my chest and go. It will be said that I feared 

to be taken for that soldier's death." 

 

"You are unkind to press me so." 

 

"Nay, it is kindest to both of us. Do you then love some other man?" 

 

"I must confess I do," she murmured, looking at him out of the corners 

of her eyes. 

 

Now Peter, strong as he was, turned faint, and in his agitation let go 

her hand which she lifted, the violets still between her fingers, 

considering it as though it were a new thing to her. 

 

"I have no right to ask you who he is," he muttered, striving to control 

himself. 

 

"Nay, but, Peter, I will tell you. It is my father--what other man 

should I love?" 

 

"Margaret!" he said in wrath, "you are fooling me." 

 

"How so? What other man should I love--unless, indeed, it were 


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