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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

life, with its mingled joys and sorrows, had come home suddenly. When 

she had finished, this silent man, to whom even his great happiness 

brought few words, said only: 

 

"God has been very good to us. Let us thank God." 

 

So they did, then, even there, seated side by side upon the bench, 

because the grass was too wet for them to kneel on, praying in their 

simple, childlike faith that the Power which had brought them together, 

and taught them to love each other, would bless them in that love and 

protect them from all harms, enemies, and evils through many a long 

year of life. 

 

Their prayer finished, they sat together on the seat, now talking, and 

now silent in their joy, while all too fast the time wore on. At 

length--it was after one of these spells of blissful silence--a change 

came over them, such a change as falls upon some peaceful scene when, 

unexpected and complete, a black stormcloud sweeps across the sun, and, 

in place of its warm light, pours down gloom full of the promise of 

tempest and of rain. Apprehension got a hold of them. They were both 

afraid of what they could not guess. 

 

"Come," she said, "it is time to go in. My father will miss us." 

 

So without more words or endearments they rose and walked side by side 

out of the shelter of the elms into the open garden. Their heads were 

bent, for they were lost in thought, and thus it came about that 

Margaret saw her feet pass suddenly into the shadow of a man, and, 

looking up, perceived standing in front of her, grave, alert, amused, 

none other than the Senor d'Aguilar. She uttered a little stifled 

scream, while Peter, with the impulse that causes a brave and startled 

hound to rush at that which frightens it, gave a leap forward towards 

the Spaniard. 

 

"Mother of God! do you take me for a thief?" he asked in a laughing 

voice, as he stepped to one side to avoid him. 

 

"Your pardon," said Peter, shaking himself together; "but you surprised 

us appearing so suddenly where we never thought to see you." 

 

"Any more than I thought to see you here, for this seems a strange place 

to linger on so cold a morning," and he looked at them again with his 

curious, mocking eyes that appeared to read the secret of their souls, 

while they grew red as roses beneath his scrutiny. "Permit me to 

explain," he went on. "I came here thus early on your service, to warn 

you, Master Peter, not to go abroad to-day, since a writ is out for your 

arrest, and as yet I have had no time to quash it by friendly 


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