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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

settlement. Well, as it chanced, I met that handsome lady who was with 

you yesterday, returning from her marketing--a friendly soul--she says 

she is your cousin. She brought me to the house, and having learned that 

your father, whom I wished to see, was at his prayers, good man, in the 

old chapel, led me to its door and left me to seek him. I entered, but 

could not find him, so, having waited a while, strayed into this garden 

through the open door, purposing to walk here till some one should 

appear, and, you see, I have been fortunate beyond my expectations 

or deserts." 

 

"So!" said Peter shortly, for the man's manner and elaborated 

explanations filled him with disgust. "Let us seek Master Castell that 

he may hear the story." 

 

"And we thank you much for coming to warn us," murmured Margaret. "I 

will go find my father," and she slipped past him towards the door. 

 

D'Aguilar watched her enter it, then turned to Peter and said: 

 

"You English are a hardy folk who take the spring air so early. Well, in 

such company I would do the same. Truly she is a beauteous maiden. I 

have some experience of the sex, but never do I remember one so fair." 

 

"My cousin is well enough," answered Peter coldly, for this Spaniard's 

very evident admiration of Margaret did not please him. 

 

"Yes," answered d'Aguilar, taking no notice of his tone, "she is well 

enough to fill the place, not of a merchant's daughter, but of a great 

lady--a countess reigning over towns and lands, or a queen even; the 

royal robes and ornaments would become that carriage and that brow." 

 

"My cousin seeks no such state who is happy in her quiet lot," answered 

Peter again; then added quickly, "See, here comes Master Castell 

seeking you." 

 

D'Aguilar advanced and greeted the merchant courteously, noticing as he 

did so that, notwithstanding his efforts to appear unconcerned, Castell 

seemed ill at ease. 

 

"I am an early visitor," he said, "but I knew that you business folk 

rise with the lark, and I wished to catch our friend here before he went 

out," and he repeated to him the reason of his coming. 

 

"I thank you, Senor," answered Castell. "You are very good to me and 

mine. I am sorry that you have been kept waiting. They tell me that you 

looked for me in the chapel, but I was not there, who had already left 

it for my office." 

 

"So I found. It is a quaint place, that old chapel of yours, and while I 

waited I went to the altar and told my beads there, which I had no time 


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