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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

to do before I left my lodgings." 

 

Castell started almost imperceptibly, and glanced at d'Aguilar with his 

quick eyes, then turned the subject and asked if he would not breakfast 

with them. He declined, however, saying that he must be about their 

business and his own, then promptly proposed that he should come to 

supper on the following night that was--Sunday--and make report how 

things had gone, a suggestion that Castell could not but accept. 

 

So he bowed and smiled himself out of the house, and walked thoughtfully 

into Holborn, for it had pleased him to pay this visit on foot, and 

unattended. At the corner whom should he meet again but the tall, 

fair-haired Betty, returning from some errand which she had found it 

convenient to fulfil just then. 

 

"What," he said, "you once more! The saints are very kind to me this 

morning. Come, Senora, walk a little way with me, for I would ask you a 

few questions." 

 

Betty hesitated, then gave way. It was seldom that she found the chance 

of walking through Holborn with such a noble-looking cavalier. 

 

"Never look at your working-dress," he said. 

 

"With such a shape, what matters the robe that covers it?"--a compliment 

at which Betty blushed, for she was proud of her fine figure. 

 

"Would you like a mantilla of real Spanish lace for your head and 

shoulders? Well, you shall have one that I brought from Spain with me, 

for I know no other lady in the land whom it would become better. But, 

Mistress Betty, you told me wrong about your master. I went to the 

chapel and he was not there." 

 

"He was there, Senor," she answered, eager to set herself right with 

this most agreeable and discriminating foreigner, "for I saw him go in a 

moment before, and he did not come out again." 

 

"Then, Senora, where could he have hidden himself? Has the place a 

crypt?" 

 

"None that I have heard of; but," she added, "there is a kind of little 

room behind the altar." 

 

"Indeed. How do you know that? I saw no room." 

 

"Because one day I heard a voice behind the tapestry, Senor, and, 

lifting it, saw a sliding door left open, and Master Castell kneeling 

before a table and saying his prayers aloud." 

 

"How strange! And what was there on the table?" 

 

"Only a queer-shaped box of wood like a little house, and two 

candlesticks, and some rolls of parchment. But I forgot, Senor; I 

promised Master Castell to say nothing about that place, for he turned 

and saw me, and came at me like a watchdog out of its kennel. You won't 


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