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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

say that I told you, will you, Senor?" 

 

"Not I; your good master's private cupboard does not interest me. Now I 

want to know something more. Why is that beautiful cousin of yours not 

married? Has she no suitors?" 

 

"Suitors, Senor? Yes, plenty of them, but she sends them all about their 

business, and seems to have no mind that way." 

 

"Perhaps she is in love with her cousin, that long-legged, strong-armed, 

wooden-headed Master Brome." 

 

"Oh! no, Senor, I don't think so; no lady could be in love with him--he 

is too stern and silent." 

 

"I agree with you, Senora. Then perhaps he is in love with her." 

 

Betty shook her head, and replied: 

 

"Peter Brome doesn't think anything of women, Senor. At least he never 

speaks to or of them." 

 

"Which shows that probably he thinks about them all the more. Well, 

well, it is no affair of ours, is it? Only I am glad to hear that there 

is nothing between them, since your mistress ought to marry high, and be 

a great lady, not a mere merchant's wife." 

 

"Yes, Senor. Though Peter Brome is not a merchant, at least by birth, he 

is high-born, and should be Sir Peter Brome if his father had not fought 

on the wrong side and sold his land. He is a soldier, and a very brave 

one, they say, as all might see last night." 

 

"No doubt, and perhaps would make a great captain, if he had the chance, 

with his stern face and silent tongue. But, Senora Betty, say, how comes 

it that, being so handsome," and he bowed, "you are not married either? 

I am sure it can be from no lack of suitors." 

 

Again Betty, foolish girl, flushed with pleasure at the compliment. 

 

"You are right, Senor," she answered. "I have plenty of them; but I am 

like my cousin--they do not please me. Although my father lost his 

fortune, I come of good blood, and I suppose that is why I do not care 

for these low-born men, and would rather remain as I am than marry 

one of them." 

 

"You are quite right," said d'Aguilar in his sympathetic voice. "Do not 

stain your blood. Marry in your own class, or not at all, which, indeed, 

should not be difficult for one so beautiful and charming." And he 

looked into her large eyes with tender admiration. 

 

This quality, indeed, soon began to demonstrate itself so actively, for 

they were now in the fields where few people wandered, that Betty, who 

although vain was proud and upright, thought it wise to recollect that 

she must be turning homewards. So, in spite of his protests, she left 


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