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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

him and departed, walking upon air. 

 

How splendid and handsome this foreign gentleman was, she thought to 

herself, really a great cavalier, and surely he admired her truly. Why 

should he not? Such things had often been. Many a rich lady whom she 

knew was not half so handsome or so well born as herself, and would make 

him a worse wife--that is, and the thought chilled her somewhat--if he 

were not already married. 

 

From all of which it will be seen that d'Aguilar had quickly succeeded 

in the plan which only presented itself to him a few hours before. Betty 

was already half in love with him. Not that he had any desire to possess 

this beautiful but foolish woman's heart, who saw in her only a useful 

tool, a stepping-stone by means of which he might draw near to Margaret. 

 

For with Margaret, it may be said at once, he was quite in love. At the 

sight of her sweet yet imperial beauty, as he saw her first, 

dishevelled, angry, frightened, in the crowd outside the king's 

banqueting-hall, his southern blood had taken sudden fire. Finished 

voluptuary though he was, the sensation he experienced then was quite 

new to him. He longed for this woman as he had never longed for any 

other, and, what is more, he desired to make her his wife. Why not? 

Although there was a flaw in it, his rank was high, and therefore she 

was beneath him; but for this her loveliness would atone, and she had 

wit and learning enough to fill any place that he could give her. Also, 

great as was his wealth, his wanton, spendthrift way of life had brought 

him many debts, and she was the only child of one of the richest 

merchants in England, whose dower, doubtless, would be a fortune that 

many a royal princess might envy. Why not again? He would turn Inez and 

those others adrift--at any rate, for a while--and make her mistress of 

his palace there in Granada. Instantly, as is often the fashion of those 

who have Eastern blood in their veins, d'Aguilar had made up his mind, 

yes, before he left her father's table on the previous night. He would 

marry Margaret and no other woman. 

 

Yet at once he had seen many difficulties in his path. To begin with, he 

mistrusted him of Peter, that strong, quiet man who could kill a great 

armed knave with his stick, and at a word call half London to his side. 

Peter, he was sure, being human, must be in love with Margaret, and he 

was a rival to be feared. Well, if Margaret had no thoughts of Peter, 

this mattered nothing, and if she had--and what were they doing together 


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