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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

station; while for some purpose of his own--an ill one, I'll warrant-- 

that Spaniard plays upon her weakness, which, if it be not curbed, may 

bring trouble on us all. Now, enough of Betty Dene; I must to my work." 

 

"Sir," said Peter, speaking for the first time, "we would have a 

private word with you." 

 

"A private word," he said, looking up anxiously. "Well, speak on. No, 

this place is not private; I think its walls have ears. Follow me," and 

he led the way into the old chapel, whereof, when they had all passed 

it, he bolted the door. "Now," he said, "what is it?" 

 

"Sir," answered Peter, standing before him, "having your leave at last, 

I asked your daughter in marriage this morning." 

 

"At least you lose no time, friend Peter; unless you had called her from 

her bed and made your offer through the door you could not have done it 

quicker. Well, well, you ever were a man of deeds, not words, and what 

says my Margaret?" 

 

"An hour ago she said she was content," answered Peter. 

 

"A cautious man also," went on Castell with a twinkle in his eye, "who 

remembers that women have been known to change their minds within an 

hour. After such long thought, what say you now, Margaret?" 

 

"That I am angry with Peter," she answered, stamping her small foot, 

"for if he does not trust me for an hour, how can he trust me for his 

life and mine?" 

 

"Nay, Margaret, you do not understand me," said Peter. "I wished not to 

bind you, that is all, in case----" 

 

"Now you are saying it again," she broke in vexed, and yet amused. "Do 

so a third time, and I will you at your word." 

 

"It seems best that I should remain silent. Speak you," said Peter 

humbly. 

 

"Aye, for truly you are a master of silence, as I should know, if any 

do," replied Margaret, bethinking her of the weary months and years of 

waiting. "Well, I will answer for you.--Father, Peter was right; I am 

content to marry him, though to do so will be to enter the Order of the 

Silent Brothers. Yes, I am content; not for himself, indeed, who has so 

many faults, but for myself, who chance to love him," and she smiled 

sweetly enough. 

 

"Do not jest on such matters, Margaret." 

 

"Why not, father? Peter is solemn enough for both of us--look at him. 

Let us laugh while we may, for who knows when tears may come?" 

 

"A good saying," answered Castell with a sigh. "So you two have plighted 

your troth, and, my children, I am glad of it, for who knows when those 


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