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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER VI 

 

FAREWELL

 

 

D'Aguilar came to supper that night as he had promised, and this time 

not on foot and unattended, but with pomp and circumstance as befitted a 

great lord. First appeared two running footmen to clear the way; then 

followed D'Aguilar, mounted on a fine white horse, and splendidly 

apparelled in a velvet cloak and a hat with nodding ostrich plumes, 

while after him rode four men-at-arms in his livery. 

 

"We asked one guest, or rather he asked himself, and we have got seven, 

to say nothing of their horses," grumbled Castell, watching their 

approach from an upper window. "Well, we must make the best of it. 

Peter, go, see that man and beast are fed, and fully, that they may not 

grumble at our hospitality. The guard can eat in the little hall with 

our own folk. Margaret, put on your richest robe and your jewels, those 

which you wore when I took you to that city feast last summer. We will 

show these fine, foreign birds that we London merchants have brave 

feathers also." 

 

Peter hesitated, misdoubting him of the wisdom of this display, who, if 

he could have his will, would have sent the Spaniard's following to the 

tavern, and received him in sober garments to a simple meal. 

 

But Castell, who seemed somewhat disturbed that night, who loved, 

moreover, to show his wealth at times after the fashion of a Jew, began 

to fume and ask if he must go himself. So the end of it was that Peter 

went, shaking his head, while, urged to it by her father, Margaret 

departed also to array herself. 

 

A few minutes later Castell, in his costliest feast-day robe, greeted 

d'Aguilar in the ante-hall, and, the two of them being alone, asked him 

how matters went as regarded de Ayala and the man who had been killed. 

 

"Well and ill," answered d'Aguilar. "Doctor de Puebla, with whom I hoped 

to deal, has left London in a huff, for he says that there is not room 

for two Spanish ambassadors at Court, so I had to fall back upon de 

Ayala after all. Indeed, twice have I seen that exalted priest upon the 

subject of the well-deserved death of his villainous servant, and, after 

much difficulty, for having lost several men in such brawls, he thought 

his honour touched, he took the fifty gold angels--to be transmitted to 

the fellow's family, of course, or so he said--and gave a receipt. Here 

it is," and he handed a paper to Castell, who read it carefully. 

 

It was to the effect that Peter Brome, having paid a sum of fifty angels 

to the relatives of Andrew Pherson, a servant of the Spanish ambassador, 


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