Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

which Andrew the said Peter had killed in a brawl, the said ambassador 

undertook not to prosecute or otherwise molest the said Peter on account 

of the manslaughter which he had committed. 

 

"But no money has been paid," said Castell. 

 

"Indeed yes, I paid it. De Ayala gives no receipts against promises." 

 

"I thank you for your courtesy, Senor. You shall have the gold before 

you leave this house. Few would have trusted a stranger thus far." 

 

D'Aguilar waved his hand. 

 

"Make no mention of such a trifle. I would ask you to accept it as a 

token of my regard for your family, only that would be to affront so 

wealthy a man. But listen, I have more to say. You are, or rather your 

kinsman Peter, is still in the wood. De Ayala has pardoned him; but 

there remains the King of England, whose law he has broken. Well, this 

day I have seen the King, who, by the way, talked of you as a worthy 

man, saying that he had always thought only a Jew could be so wealthy, 

and that he knew you were not, since you had been reported to him as a 

good son of the Church," and he paused, looking at Castell. 

 

"I fear his Grace magnifies my wealth, which is but small," answered 

Castell coolly, leaving the rest of his speech unnoticed. "But what said 

his Grace?" 

 

"I showed him de Ayala's receipt, and he answered that if his Excellency 

was satisfied, he was satisfied, and for his part would not order any 

process to issue; but he bade me tell you and Peter Brome that if he 

caused more tumult in his streets, whatever the provocation, and 

especially if that tumult were between English and Spaniards, he would 

hang him at once with trial or without it. All of which he said very 

angrily, for the last thing which his Highness desires just now is any 

noise between Spain and England." 

 

"That is bad," answered Castell, "for this very morning there was near 

to being such a tumult," and he told the story of how the two Spaniards 

had waylaid Peter, and one of them been knocked down by the serving-man 

with a stone. At this news d'Aguilar shook his head. 

 

"Then that is just where the trouble lies," he exclaimed. "I know it 

from my people, who keep me well informed, that all those servants of de 

Ayala, and there are more than twenty of them, have sworn an oath by the 

Virgin of Seville that before they leave this land they will have your 

kinsman's blood in payment for that of Andrew Pherson, who, although a 


Page 2 from 8:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   7   8   Forward