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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

Scotchman, was their officer, and a brave man whom they loved much. Now, 

if they attack him, as they will, there must be a brawl, for Peter 

fights well, and if there is a brawl, though Peter and the English get 

the best of it, as very likely they may, Peter will certainly be hanged, 

for so the King has promised." 

 

"Before they leave the land? When do they leave it?" 

 

"De Ayala sails within a month, and his folk with him, for his 

co-ambassador, the Doctor de Puebla, will bear with him no more, and has 

written from the country house where he is sulking that one of them 

must go." 

 

"Then I think it is best, Senor, that Peter should travel for a month." 

 

"Friend Castell, you are wise; I think so too, and, I counsel you, 

arrange it at once. Hush! here comes the lady, your daughter." 

 

As he spoke, Margaret appeared descending the broad oak stairs which led 

into the ante-room. Holding a lamp in her hand, she was in full light, 

whereas the two men stood in the shadow. She wore a low-cut dress of 

crimson velvet, embroidered about the bodice with dead gold, which 

enhanced the dazzling whiteness of her shapely neck and bosom. Round her 

throat hung a string of great pearls, and on her head was a net of 

gold, studded with smaller pearls, from beneath which her glorious, 

chestnut-black hair flowed down in rippling waves almost to her knees. 

Having her father's bidding so to do, she had adorned herself thus that 

she might look her fairest, not in the eyes of their guest, but in those 

of her new-affianced husband. So fair was she seen thus that d'Aguilar, 

the artist, the adorer of loveliness, caught his breath and shivered at 

the sight of her. 

 

"By the eleven thousand virgins!" he said, "your daughter is more 

beautiful than all of them put together. She should be crowned a queen, 

and bewitch the world." 

 

"Nay, nay, Senor," answered Castell hurriedly; "let her remain humble 

and honest, and bewitch her husband." 

 

"So I should say if I were the husband," he muttered, then stepped 

forward, bowing, to meet her. 

 

Now the light of the silver lamp she held on high flowed over the two of 

them, d'Aguilar and Margaret, and certainly they seemed a well-matched 

pair. Both were tall and cast by Nature in a rich and splendid mould; 

both had that high air of breeding which comes with ancient blood--for 

what bloods are more ancient than those of the Jew and the 

Eastern?--both were slow and stately of movement, low-voiced, and 

dignified of speech. Castell noted it and was afraid, he knew not 


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