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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

of what. 

 

Peter, entering the room by another door, clad only in his grey clothes, 

for he would not put on gay garments for the Spaniard, noted it also, 

and with the quick instinct of love knew this magnificent foreigner for 

a rival and an enemy. But he was not afraid, only jealous and angry. 

Indeed, nothing would have pleased him better then than that the 

Spaniard should have struck him in the face, so that within five minutes 

it might be shown which of them was the better man. It must come to 

this, he felt, and very glad would he have been if it could come at the 

beginning and not at the end, so that one or the other of them might be 

saved much trouble. Then he remembered that he had promised to say or 

show nothing of how things stood between him and Margaret, and, coming 

forward, he greeted d'Aguilar quietly but coldly, telling him that his 

horses had been stabled, and his retinue accommodated. 

 

The Spaniard thanked him very heartily, and they passed in to supper. It 

was a strange meal for all four of them, yet outwardly pleasant enough. 

Forgetting his cares, Castell drank gaily, and began to talk of the many 

changes which he had seen in his life, and of the rise and fall of 

kings. D'Aguilar talked also, of the Spanish wars and policy, for in the 

first he had seen much service, and of the other he knew every turn. It 

was easy to see that he was one of those who mixed with courts, and had 

the ear of ministers and majesty. Margaret also, being keen-witted and 

anxious to learn of the great world that lay beyond Holborn and London 

town, asked questions, seeking to know, amongst other things, what were 

the true characters of Ferdinand, King of Aragon, and Isabella his wife, 

the famous queen. 

 

"I will tell you in few words, Senora. Ferdinand is the most ambitious 

man in Europe, false also if it serves his purpose. He lives for self 

and gain--that money and power. These are his gods, for he has no true 

religion. He is not clever but, being very cunning, he will succeed and 

leave a famous name behind him." 

 

"An ugly picture," said Margaret. "And what of his queen?" 

 

"She," answered d'Aguilar, "is a great woman, who knows how to use the 

temper of her time and so attain her ends. To the world she shows a 

tender heart, but beneath it lies hid an iron resolution." 

 

"What are those ends?" asked Margaret again. 

 

"To bring all Spain under her rule; utterly to crush the Moors and take 


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