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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

On the morrow when Castell told Margaret that her lover must leave her 

for a while that night--for this Peter would not do himself--she prayed 

him even with tears that he would not send him so far from her, or that 

they might all go together. But he reasoned with her kindly, showing her 

that the latter was impossible, and that if Peter did not go at once it 

was probable that Peter would soon be dead, whereas, if he went, there 

would be but one short month of waiting till the Spaniards had sailed, 

after which they might be married and live in peace and safety. 

 

So she came to see that this was best and wisest, and gave way; but oh! 

heavy were those hours, and sore was their parting. Essex was no far 

journey, and to enter into lands which only two days before Peter 

believed he had lost for ever, no sad errand, while the promise that at 

the end of a single month he should return to claim his bride hung 

before them like a star. Yet they were sad-hearted, both of them, and 

that star seemed very far away. 

 

Margaret was afraid lest Peter might be waylaid upon the road, but he 

laughed at her, saying that her father was sending six stout men with 

him as an escort, and thus companioned he feared no Spaniards. Peter, 

for his part, was afraid lest d'Aguilar might make love to her while he 

was away. But now she laughed at him, saying that all her heart was his, 

and that she had none to give to d'Aguilar or any other man. Moreover, 

that England was a free land in which women, who were no king's wards, 

could not be led whither they did not wish to go. So it seemed that they 

had naught to fear, save the daily chance of life and death. And yet 

they were afraid. 

 

"Dear love," said Margaret to him after she had thought a while, "our 

road looks straight and easy, and yet there may be pitfalls in it that 

we cannot guess. Therefore you must swear one thing to me: That whatever 

you shall hear or whatever may happen, you will never doubt me as I 

shall never doubt you. If, for instance, you should be told that I have 

discarded you, and given myself to some other husband; if even you 

should believe that you see it signed by my hand, or if you think that 

you hear it told to you by my voice--still, I say, believe it not." 

 

"How could such a thing be?" asked Peter anxiously. 

 

"I do not suppose that it could be; I only paint the worst that might 

happen as a lesson for us both. Heretofore my life has been calm as a 


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