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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER VII 

 

NEWS FROM SPAIN

 

 

Peter Brome was a very quiet man, whose voice was not often heard about 

the place, and yet it was strange how dull and different the big, old 

house in Holborn seemed without him. Even the handsome Betty, with whom 

he was never on the best of terms, since there was much about her of 

which he disapproved, missed him, and said so to her cousin, who only 

answered with a sigh. For in the bottom of her heart Betty both feared 

and respected Peter. The fear was of his observant eyes and caustic 

words, which she knew were always words of truth, and the respect for 

the general uprightness of his character, especially where her own sex 

was concerned. 

 

In fact, as has been hinted, some little time before, when Peter had 

first come to live with the Castells, Betty, thinking him a proper man 

of gentle birth, such a one indeed as she would wish to marry, had made 

advances to him, which, as he did not seem to notice them, became by 

degrees more and more marked. What happened at last they two knew alone, 

but it was something that caused Betty to become very angry, and to 

speak of Peter to her friends as a cold-blooded lout who thought only of 

work and gain. The episode was passing, and soon forgotten by the lady 

in the press of other affairs; but the respect remained. Moreover, on 

one or two occasions, when the love of admiration had led her into 

griefs, Peter had proved a good friend, and what was better, a friend 

who did not talk. Therefore she wished him back again, especially now, 

when something that was more than mere vanity and desire for excitement 

had taken hold of her, and Betty found herself being swept off her feet 

into very deep and doubtful waters. 

 

The shopmen and the servants missed him also, for to him all disputes 

were brought for settlement, nor, provided it had not come about through 

lack of honesty, were any pains too great for him to take to help them 

in a trouble. Most of all Castell missed him, since until Peter had gone 

he did not know how much he had learned to rely upon him, both in his 

business and as a friend. As for Margaret, her life without him was one 

long, empty night. 

 

Thus it chanced that in such a house any change was welcome, and, though 

she liked him little enough, Margaret was not even displeased when one 

morning Betty told her that the lord d'Aguilar was coming to call on her 

that day, and purposed to bring her a present. 

 

"I do not seek his presents," said Margaret indifferently; then added, 


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