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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

"But how do you know that, Betty?" 

 

The young woman coloured, and tossed her head as she answered: 

 

"I know it, Cousin, because, as I was going to visit my old aunt 

yesterday, who lives on the wharf at Westminster, I met him riding, and 

he called out to me, saying that he had a gift for you and one for 

me also." 

 

"Be careful you do not meet him too often, Betty, when you chance to be 

visiting your aunt. These Spaniards are not always over-honest, as you 

may learn to your sorrow." 

 

"I thank you for your good counsel," said Betty, shortly, "but I, who am 

older than you, know enough of men to be able to guard myself, and can 

keep them at a distance." 

 

"I am glad of it, Betty, only sometimes I have thought that the distance 

was scarcely wide enough," answered Margaret, and left the subject, for 

she was thinking of other things. 

 

That afternoon, when Margaret was walking in the garden, Betty, whose 

face seemed somewhat flushed, ran up to her and said that the lord 

d'Aguilar was waiting in the hall. 

 

"Very good," answered Margaret, "I will come. Go, tell my father, that 

he may join us. But why are you so disturbed and hurried?" she added 

wonderingly. 

 

"Oh!" answered Betty, "he has brought me a present, so fine a present--a 

mantle of the most wonderful lace that ever I saw, and a comb of mottled 

shell mounted in gold to keep it off the hair. He made me wait while he 

showed me how to put it on, and that was why I ran." 

 

Margaret did not quite see the connection; but she answered slowly: 

 

"Perhaps it would have been wiser if you had run first. I do not 

understand why this fine lord brings you presents." 

 

"But he has brought one for you also, Cousin, although he would not say 

what it was." 

 

"That I understand still less. Go, tell my father that the Senor 

d'Aguilar awaits him." 

 

Then she went into the hall, and found d'Aguilar looking at an 

illuminated Book of Hours in which she had been reading, that was 

written in Spanish in one column and in Latin in that opposite. He 

greeted her in his usual graceful way, that, where Margaret was 

concerned, was easy and well-bred without being bold, and said at once: 

 

"So you read Spanish, Senora?" 

 

"A little. Not very well, I fear." 

 

"And Latin also?" 

 

"A little again. I have been taught that tongue. By studying them thus I 

try to improve myself in both." 

 

"I perceive that you are learned as you are beautiful," and he bowed 


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