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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"I thank you, Senor; but I lay claim to neither grace." 

 

"What need is there to claim that which is evident?" replied d'Aguilar; 

then added, "But I forgot, I have brought you a present, if you will be 

pleased to accept it. Or, rather, I bring you what is your own, or at 

the least your father's. I bargained with his Excellency Don de Ayala, 

pointing out that fifty gold angels were too much to pay for that dead 

rogue of his; but he would give me nothing back in money, since with 

gold he never parts. Yet I won some change from him, and it stands 

without your door. It is a Spanish jennet of the true Moorish blood, 

which, hundreds of years ago, that people brought with them from the 

East. He needs it no longer, as he returns to Spain, and it is trained 

to bear a lady." Margaret did not know what to answer, but, 

fortunately, at that moment her father appeared, and to him d'Aguilar 

repeated his tale, adding that he had heard his daughter say that the 

horse she rode had fallen with her, so that she could use it no more. 

 

 

Now, Castell did not wish to accept this gift, for such he felt it to 

be; but d'Aguilar assured him that if he did not he must sell it and 

return him the price in money, as it did not belong to him. So, there 

being no help for it, he thanked him in his daughter's name and his own, 

and they went into the stable-yard, whither it had been taken, to look 

at this horse. 

 

The moment that Castell saw it he knew that it was a creature of great 

value, pure white in colour, with a long, low body, small head, gentle 

eyes, round hoofs, and flowing mane and tail, such a horse, indeed, as a 

queen might have ridden. Now again he was confused, being sure that this 

beast had never been given back as a luck-penny, since it would have 

fetched more than the fifty angels on the market; moreover, it was 

harnessed with a woman's saddle and bridle of the most beautifully 

worked red Cordova leather, to which were attached a silver bit and 

stirrup. But d'Aguilar smiled, and vowed that things were as he had told 

them, so there was nothing more to be said. Margaret, too, was so 

pleased with the mare, which she longed to ride, that she forgot her 

scruples, and tried to believe that this was so. Noting her delight, 

which she could not conceal as she patted the beautiful beast, 

d'Aguilar said: 

 

"Now I will ask one thing in return for the bargain that I have 

made--that I may see you mount this horse for the first time. You told 


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