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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

me that you and your father were wont to go out together in the 

morning. Have I your leave, Sir," and he turned to Castell, "to ride 

with you before breakfast, say, at seven of the clock, for I would show 

the lady, your daughter, how she should manage a horse of this blood, 

which is something of a trick?" 

 

"If you will," answered Castell--"that is, if the weather is fine," for 

the offer was made so courteously that it could scarcely be refused. 

 

D'Aguilar bowed, and they re-entered the house, talking of other 

matters. When they were in the hall again, he asked whether their 

kinsman Peter had reached his destination safely, adding: 

 

"I pray you, do not tell me where it is, for I wish to be able to put my 

hand upon my heart and swear to all concerned, and especially to certain 

fellows who are still seeking for him, that I know nothing of his 

hiding-place." 

 

Castell answered that he had, since but a few minutes before a letter 

had come from him announcing his safe arrival, tidings at which Margaret 

looked up, then, remembering her promise, said that she was glad to hear 

of it, as the roads were none too safe, and spoke indifferently of 

something else. D'Aguilar added that he also was glad, then, rising, 

took his leave "till seven on the morrow." 

 

When he had gone, Castell gave Margaret a letter, addressed to her in 

Peter's stiff, upright hand, which she read eagerly. It began and ended 

with sweet words, but, like his speech, was brief and to the point, 

saying only that he had accomplished his journey without adventure, and 

was very glad to find himself again in the old house where he was born, 

and amongst familiar fields and faces. On the morrow he was to see the 

tradesmen as to alterations and repairs which were much needed, even the 

moat being choked with mud and weeds. His last sentence was: "I much 

mistrust me of that fine Spaniard, and I am jealous to think that he 

should be near to you while I am far away. Beware of him, I say--beware 

of him. May the Mother of God and all the saints have you in their 

keeping! Your most true affianced lover." 

 

This letter Margaret answered before she slept, for the messenger was to 

return at dawn, telling Peter, amongst other things, of the gift which 

d'Aguilar had brought her, and how she and her father were forced to 

accept it, but bidding him not be jealous, since, although the gift was 

welcome, she liked the giver little, who did but count the hours till 

her true lover should come back again and take her to himself. 


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