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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

Next morning she was up early, clothed in her riding-dress, for the day 

was very fine, and by seven o'clock d'Aguilar appeared, mounted on a 

great horse. Then the Spanish jennet was brought out, and deftly he 

lifted her to the saddle, showing her how she must pull but lightly on 

the reins, and urge or check her steed with her voice alone, using no 

whip or spur. 

 

A perfect beast it proved to be, indeed, gentle as a lamb, and easy, yet 

very spirited and swift. 

 

D'Aguilar was a pleasant cavalier also, talking of many things grave and 

gay, until at length even Castell forgot his thoughts, and grew cheerful 

as they cantered forward through the fresh spring morning by heath and 

hill and woodland, listening to the singing of the birds, and watching 

the husbandmen at their labour. This ride was but the first of several 

that they took, since d'Aguilar knew their hours of exercise, even when 

they changed them, and whether they asked him or not, joined or met them 

in such a natural fashion that they could not refuse his company. 

Indeed, they were much puzzled to know how he came to be so well 

acquainted with their movements, and even with the direction in which 

they proposed to ride, but supposed that he must have it from the 

grooms, although these were commanded to say nothing, and always denied 

having spoken with him. That Betty should speak of such matters, or even 

find opportunity of doing so, never chanced to cross their minds, who 

did not guess that if they rode with d'Aguilar in the morning, Betty 

often walked with him in the evening when she was supposed to be at 

church, or sewing, or visiting her aunt upon the wharf at Westminster. 

But of these walks the foolish girl said nothing, for her own reasons. 

 

Now, as they rode together, although he remained very courteous and 

respectful, the manner of d'Aguilar towards Margaret grew ever more 

close and intimate. Thus he began to tell her stories, true or false, of 

his past life, which seemed to have been strange and eventful enough; to 

hint, too, of a certain hidden greatness that pertained to him which he 

did not dare to show, and of high ambitions which he had. He spoke also 

of his loneliness, and his desire to lose it in the companionship of a 

kindred heart, if he could find one to share his wealth, his station, 

and his hopes; while all the time his dark eyes, fixed on Margaret, 

seemed to say, "The heart I seek is such a one as yours." At length, 


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