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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

at some murmured word or touch, she took affright, and, since she could 

not avoid him abroad, determined to stay at home, and, much as she loved 

the sport, to ride no more till Peter should return. So she gave out 

that she had hurt her knee, which made the saddle painful to her, and 

the beautiful Spanish mare was left idle in the stable, or mounted only 

by the groom. 

 

Thus for some days she was rid of d'Aguilar, and employed herself in 

reading and working, or in writing long letters to Peter, who was busy 

enough at Dedham, and sent her thence many commissions to fulfil. 

 

One afternoon Castell was seated in his office deciphering letters which 

had just reached him. The night before his best ship, of over two 

hundred tons burden, which was named the _Margaret_, after his daughter, 

had come safely into the mouth of the Thames from Spain. That evening 

she was to reach her berth at Gravesend with the tide, when Castell 

proposed to go aboard of her to see to the unloading of her cargo. This 

was the last of his ships which remained unsold, and it was his plan to 

re-load and victual her at once with goods that were waiting, and send 

her back to the port of Seville, where his Spanish partners, in whose 

name she was already registered, had agreed to take her over at a fixed 

price. This done, it was only left for him to hand over his business to 

the merchants who had purchased it in London, after which he would be 

free to depart, a very wealthy man, and spend the evening of his days at 

peace in Essex, with his daughter and her husband, as now he so greatly 

longed to do. So soon as they were within the river banks the captain of 

this ship, Smith by name, had landed the cargo-master with letters and 

a manifest of cargo, bidding him hire a horse and bring them to Master 

Castell's house in Holborn. This the man had done safely, and it was 

these letters that Castell read. 

 

One of them was from his partner Bernaldez in Seville; not in answer to 

that which he had written on the night of the opening of this 

history--for this there had been no time--yet dealing with matters 

whereof it treated. In it was this passage: 

 

"You will remember what I wrote to you of a certain envoy who has been 

sent to the Court of London, who is called d'Aguilar, for as our cipher 

is so secret, and it is important that you should be warned, I take the 

risk of writing his name. Since that letter I have learned more 

concerning this grandee, for such he is. Although he calls himself plain 


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