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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

paid you all we owe, and go to some place where you will be forgotten 

for a while, since that bloodhound d'Aguilar, for so he calls himself, 

after his mother's birthplace, has not tracked you to London for 

nothing. As yet, thanks be to God, no suspicion has fallen on any of us; 

perhaps because we have many in our pay." 

 

When Castell had finished transcribing all this passage he read it 

through carefully. Then he went into the hall, where a fire burned, for 

the day was cold, and threw the translation on to it, watching until it 

was consumed, after which he returned to his office, and hid away the 

letter in a secret cupboard behind the panelling of the wall. This done, 

he sat himself in his chair to think. 

 

"My good friend Juan Bernaldez is right," he said to himself; 

"d'Aguilar, or the Marquis Morella, does not nose me and the others out 

for nothing. Well, I shall not trust myself in Spain, and the money, 

most of it, except what is still to come from Spain, is put out where it 

will never be found by him, at good interest too. All seems safe 

enough--and yet I would to God that Peter and Margaret were fast 

married, and that we three sat together, out of sight and mind, in the 

Old Hall at Dedham. I have carried on this game too long. I should have 

closed my books a year ago; but the trade was so good that I could not. 

I was wise also, who in this one lucky year have nearly doubled my 

fortune. And yet it would have been safer, before they guessed that I 

was so rich. Greed--mere greed--for I do not need this money which may 

destroy us all! Greed! The ancient pitfall of my race." 

 

As he thought thus there came a knock upon his door. Snatching up a pen 

he dipped it in the ink-horn and, calling "Enter," began to add a column 

of figures on a paper before him. 

 

The door opened; but he seemed to take no heed, so diligently did he 

count his figures. Yet, although his eyes were fixed upon the paper, in 

some way that he could not understand he was well aware that d'Aguilar 

and no other stood in the room behind him, the truth being, no doubt, 

that unconsciously he had recognised his footstep. For a moment the 

knowledge turned him cold--he who had just been reading of the mission 

of this man--and feared what was to come. Yet he acted well. 

 

"Why do you disturb me, Daughter?" he said testily, and without looking 

round. "Have not things gone ill enough with half the cargo destroyed by 

sea-water, and the rest, that you must trouble me while I sum up my 


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