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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"Your information is good--as good as mine, almost. Doubtless you do not 

like that bar in the blood. Well, if it were not there, I should be 

where Ferdinand is, should I not? So I do not like it either, though it 

is good blood and ancient--that of those high-bred Moors. Now, may not 

the nephew of a king and the son of a princess of Granada be fit to mate 

with the daughter of--a Jew, yes, a Marano, and of a Christian English 

lady, of good family, but no more?" 

 

Castell lifted his hand as though to speak; but d'Aguilar went on: 

 

"Deny it not, friend; it is not worth while here in private. Was there 

not a certain Isaac of Toledo who, hard on fifty years ago, left Spain, 

for his own reasons, with a little son, and in London became known as 

Joseph Castell, having, with his son, been baptized into the Holy 

Church? Ah! you see you are not the only one who studies genealogies." 

 

"Well, Senor, if so, what of it?" 

 

"What of it? Nothing at all, friend Castell. It is an old story, is it 

not, and, as that Isaac is long dead and his son has been a good 

Christian for nearly fifty years and had a Christian wife and child, who 

will trouble himself about such a matter? If he were openly a Hebrew 

now, or worse still, if pretending to be a Christian, he in secret 

practised the rites of the accursed Jews, why then----" 

 

"Then what?" 

 

"Then, of course, he would be expelled this land, where no Jew may 

live, his wealth would be forfeit to its king, whose ward his daughter 

would become, to be given in marriage where he willed, while he himself, 

being Spanish born, might perhaps be handed over to the power of Spain, 

there to make answer to these charges. But we wander to strange matters. 

Is that alliance still impossible, Senor?" 

 

Castell looked him straight in the eyes and answered: 

 

"Yes." 

 

There was something so bold and direct in his utterance of the word that 

for a moment d'Aguilar seemed to be taken aback. He had not expected 

this sharp denial. 

 

"It would be courteous to give a reason," he said presently. 

 

"The reason is simple, Marquis. My daughter is already betrothed, and 

will ere long be wedded." 

 

D'Aguilar did not seem surprised at this intelligence. 

 

"To that brawler, your kinsman, Peter Brome, I suppose?" he said 

interrogatively. "I guessed as much, and by the saints I am sorry for 

her, for he must be a dull lover to one so fair and bright; while as a 

husband--" And he shrugged his shoulders. "Friend Castell, for her sake 


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