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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

you will break off this match." 

 

"And if I will not, Marquis?" 

 

"Then I must break it off for you in the interest of all of us, 

including, of course, myself, who love her, and wish to lift her to a 

great place, and of yourself, whom I desire should pass your old age in 

peace and wealth, and not be hunted to your death like a mad dog." 

 

"How will you break it, Marquis? by--" 

 

"Oh no, Senor!" answered d'Aguilar, "not by other men's swords--if that 

is what you mean. The worthy Peter is safe from them so far as I am 

concerned, though if he should come face to face with mine, then let the 

best man win. Have no fear, friend, I do not practise murder, who value 

my own soul too much to soak it in blood, nor would I marry a woman 

except of her own free will. Still, Peter may die, and the fair Margaret 

may still place her hand in mine and say, 'I choose you as my husband.'" 

 

"All these things, and many others, may happen, Marquis; but I do not 

think it likely that they will happen, and for my part, whilst thanking 

you for it, I decline your honourable offer, believing that my daughter 

will be more happy in her present humble state with the man she has 

chosen. Have I your leave to return to my accounts?" And he rose. 

 

"Yes, Senor," answered d'Aguilar, rising also; "but add an item to those 

losses of which you spoke, that of the friendship of Carlos, Marquis de 

Morella, and on the other side enter again that of his hate. Man!" he 

added, and his dark, handsome face turned very evil as he spoke, "are 

you mad? Think of the little tabernacle behind the altar in your chapel, 

and what it contains." 

 

Castell stared at him, then said: 

 

"Come, let us see. Nay, fear no trick; like you I remember my soul, and 

do not stain my hands with blood. Follow me, so you will be safe." 

 

Curiosity, or some other reason, prompted d'Aguilar to obey, and 

presently they stood behind the altar. 

 

"Now," said Castell, as he drew the tapestry and opened the secret door, 

"look!" D'Aguilar peered into the place; but where should have been 

the table, the ark, the candlesticks, and the roll of the law of which 

Betty had told him, were only old dusty boxes filled with parchments and 

some broken furniture. 

 

"What do you see?" asked Castell. 

 

"I see, friend, that you are even a cleverer Jew than I thought. But 

this is a matter that you must explain to others in due season. Believe 

me, I am no inquisitor." Then without more words he turned and left him. 


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