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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

When Castell, having shut the secret door and drawn the tapestry, 

hurried from the chapel, it was to find that the marquis had departed. 

 

He went back to his office much disturbed, and sat himself down there to 

think. Truly Fate, that had so long been his friend, was turning its 

face against him. Things could not have gone worse. D'Aguilar had 

discovered the secret of his faith through his spies, and, having by 

some accursed mischance fallen in love with his daughter's beauty, was 

become his bitter enemy because he must refuse her to him. Why must he 

refuse her? The man was of great position and noble blood; she would 

become the wife of one of the first grandees of Spain, one who stood 

nearest to the throne. Perhaps--such a thing was possible--she might 

live herself to be queen, or the mother of kings. Moreover, that 

marriage meant safety for himself; it meant a quiet age, a peaceable 

death in his own bed--for, were he fifty times a Marano, who would touch 

the father-in-law of the Marquis de Morella? Why? Just because he had 

promised her in marriage to Peter Brome, and through all his life as a 

merchant he had never yet broken with a bargain because it went against 

himself. That was the answer. Yet almost he could find it in his heart 

to wish that he had never made that bargain; that he had kept Peter, who 

had waited so long, waiting for another month. Well, it was too late 

now. He had passed his word, and he would keep it, whatever the 

cost might be. 

 

Rising, he called one of the servants, and bade her summon Margaret. 

Presently she returned, saying that her mistress had gone out walking 

with Betty, adding also that his horse was at the door for him to ride 

to the river, where he was to pass the night on board his ship. 

 

Taking paper, he bethought him that he would write to Margaret, warning 

her against the Spaniard. Then, remembering that she had nothing to fear 

from him, at any rate at present, and that it was not wise to set down 

such matters, he told her only to take good care of herself, and that he 

would be back in the morning. 

 

That evening, when Margaret was in her own little sitting-chamber which 

adjoined the great hall, the door opened, and she looked up from the 

work upon which she was engaged, to see d'Aguilar standing before her. 

 

"Senor!" she said, amazed, "how came you here?" 

 

"Senora," he answered, closing the door and bowing, "my feet brought me. 

Had I any other means of coming I think that I should not often be 


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