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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER IX 

 

THE SNARE

 

 

On the following morning, when Castell returned, Margaret told him of 

the visit of d'Aguilar, and of all that had passed between them, told 

him also that he was acquainted with their secret, since he had spoken 

of her as half a Jew. 

 

"I know it, I know it," answered her father, who was much disturbed and 

very angry, "for yesterday he threatened me also. But let that go, I can 

take my chance; now I would learn who brought this man into my house 

when I was absent, and without my leave." 

 

"I fear that it was Betty," said Margaret, "who swears that she thought 

she did no wrong." 

 

"Send for her," said Castell. Presently Betty came, and, being 

questioned, told a long story. 

 

She said she was standing by the side door, taking the air, when Senor 

d'Aguilar appeared, and, having greeted her, without more words walked 

into the house, saying that he had an appointment with the master. 

 

"With me?" broke in Castell. "I was absent." 

 

"I did not know that you were absent, for I was out when you rode away 

in the afternoon, and no one had spoken of it to me, so, thinking that 

he was your friend, I let him in, and let him out again afterwards. That 

is all I have to say." 

 

"Then I have to say that you are a hussy and a liar, and that, in one 

way or the other, this Spaniard has bribed you," answered Castell 

fiercely. "Now, girl, although you are my wife's cousin, and therefore 

my daughter's kin, I am minded to turn you out on to the street 

to starve." 

 

At this Betty first grew angry, then began to weep; while Margaret 

pleaded with her father, saying that it would mean the girl's ruin, and 

that he must not take such a sin upon him. So the end of it was, that, 

being a kind-hearted man, remembering also that Betty Dene was of his 

wife's blood, and that she had favoured her as her daughter did, he 

relented, taking measures to see that she went abroad no more save in 

the company of Margaret, and that the doors were opened only by 

men-servants. 

 

So this matter ended. 

 

That day Margaret wrote to Peter, telling him of all that had happened, 

and how the Spaniard had asked her in marriage, though the words that he 

used she did not tell. At the end of her letter, also, she bade him have 

no fear of the Senor d'Aguilar or of any other man, as he knew where her 

heart was. 

 

When Peter received this writing he was much vexed to learn that both 

Master Castell and Margaret had incurred the enmity of d'Aguilar, for so 


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