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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

beggared of hope and love. Moodily, full of bitterness, she went about 

her tasks, biting her lips and wiping her fine eyes with the sleeve of 

her robe, when suddenly the door opened, and a servant, not one of 

their own, but a strange man who had been brought in to help at the 

morrow's feast, called out that a sailor wished to speak with her. 

 

"Then let him enter here; I have no time to go out to listen to his 

talk," snapped Betty. 

 

Presently the sailor was shown in, the man who brought him leaving the 

room at once. He was a dark fellow, with sly black eyes, who, had he not 

spoken English so well, might have been taken for a Spaniard. 

 

"Who are you, and what is your business?" asked Betty sharply. 

 

"I am the carpenter of the ship _Margaret_," he answered, "and I am here 

to say that our master Castell has met with an accident there, and 

desires that Mistress Margaret, his daughter, should come to him 

at once." 

 

"What accident?" asked Betty. 

 

"In seeing to the stowage of cargo he slipped and fell down the hold, 

hurting his back and breaking his right arm, and that is why he cannot 

write. He is in great pain; but the physician whom we summoned bade me 

tell Mistress Margaret that at present he has no fear for his life. Are 

you Mistress Margaret?" 

 

"No," answered Betty; "but I will go to her at once; do you bide here." 

 

"Then are you her cousin, Mistress Betty Dene, for if so I have 

something for you?" 

 

"I am. What is it?" 

 

"This," said the man, drawing out a letter which he handed to her. 

 

"Who gave you this?" asked Betty suspiciously. "I do not know his 

name, but he was a noble-looking Spanish Don, and a liberal one too. He 

had heard of the accident on the _Margaret_, and, knowing my errand, 

asked me if I would deliver this letter to you, for the fee of a gold 

ducat, and promise to say nothing of it to any one else." 

 

"Some rude gallant, doubtless," said Betty, tossing her head; "they are 

ever writing to me. Bide here; I go to Mistress Margaret." 

 

Once she was outside the door Betty broke the seal of the letter eagerly 

enough, for she had been taught with Margaret, and could read well. 

It ran: 

 

"BELOVED, 

 

"You thought me faithless and gone, but 

it is not so. I was silent only because I knew you 

could not come alone who are watched; but now 

the God of Love gives us our chance. Doubtless 

your cousin will bring you with her to visit her father, 


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