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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

with the moonrise, and they only wait your coming to carry the master, 

your father, to the warehouse on shore thinking it best that you should 

be present. If you do not come, this will be done as gently as possible, 

and there you must seek him to-morrow, alive or dead." And the man took 

up his cap as though to leave. 

 

"I will come with you," said Margaret. "Betty you are right; order the 

two horses to be saddled mine and the groom's, with a pillion on which 

you can ride, for I will not send you or go alone, understand that this 

sailor has his own horse." 

 

The man nodded, and accompanied Betty to the stable. Then Margaret took 

pen and wrote hastily to Peter, telling him of their evil chance, and 

bidding him follow her at once to the ship, or, if it had sailed to the 

warehouse. "I am loth to go," she added "alone with a girl and a strange 

man, yet I must since my heart is torn with fear for my beloved father. 

Sweetheart, follow me quickly." 

 

This done, she gave the letter to that servant who had shown in the 

sailor, bidding him hand it, without fail, to Master Peter Brome when he 

came, which the man promised to do. 

 

Then she fetched plain dark cloaks for herself and Betty, with hoods to 

them, that their faces might not be seen, and presently they 

were mounted. 

 

"Stay!" said Margaret to the sailor as they were about to start. "How 

comes it that my father did not send one of his own men instead of you, 

and why did none write to me?" 

 

The man looked surprised; he was a very good actor. 

 

"His people were tending him," he said, "and he bade me to go because I 

knew the way, and had a good, hired horse ashore which I have used when 

riding with messages to London about new timbers and other matters. As 

for writing, the physician began a letter, but he was so slow and long 

that Master Castell ordered me to be off without it. It seems," the man 

added, addressing Betty with some irritation, "that Mistress Margaret 

misdoubts me. If so, let her find some other guide, or bide at home. It 

is naught to me, who have only done as I was bidden." 

 

Thus did this cunning fellow persuade Margaret that her fears were 

nothing, though, remembering the letter from d'Aguilar, Betty was 

somewhat troubled. The thing had a strange look, but, poor, vain fool, 

she thought to herself that, even if there were some trick, it was 

certainly arranged only that she might seem to be taken, who could not 

come alone. In truth she was blind and mad, and cared not what she did, 


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