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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

though, let this be said for her, she never dreamed that any harm was 

meant towards her cousin Margaret, or that a lie had been told as to 

Master Castell and his hurts. 

 

Soon they were out of London, and riding swiftly by the road that 

followed the north bank of the river, for their guide did not take them 

over the bridge, as he said the ship was lying in mid-stream and that 

the boat would be waiting on the Tilbury shore. But there was more than 

twenty miles to travel, and, push on as they would, night had fallen ere 

ever they came there. At length, when they were weary of the dark and 

the rough road, the sailor pulled up at a spot upon the river's 

brink--where there was a little wharf, but no houses that they could 

see--saying that this was the place. Dismounting, he gave his horse to 

the groom to hold, and, going to the wharf, asked in a loud voice if the 

boat from the _Margaret_ was there, to which a voice answered, "Aye." 

Then he talked for a minute to those in the boat, though what he said 

they could not hear, and ran back again, bidding them dismount, and 

adding that they had done well to come, as Master Castell was much 

worse, and did nothing but cry for his daughter. 

 

The groom he told to lead the horses a little way along the bank till he 

found an inn that stood there, where he must await their return or 

further orders, and to Betty he suggested that she should go with him, 

as there was but little place left in the boat. This she was willing 

enough to do, thinking it all part of the plan for her carrying off; but 

Margaret would have none of it, saying that unless her cousin came with 

her she would not stir another step. So grumbling a little the sailor 

gave way, and hurried them both to some wooden steps and down these into 

a boat, of which they could but dimly see the outline. 

 

So soon as ever they were seated side by side in the stern it was pushed 

off, and rowed away rapidly into the darkness, while one of the sailors 

lit a lantern which he fastened to the bow, and far out on the river, as 

though in answer to the signal, another star of light appeared, towards 

which they headed. Now Margaret, speaking through the gloom, asked the 

rowers of her father's state; but the sailor, their guide, prayed her 

not to trouble them, as the tide ran very swiftly and they must give all 

their mind to their business lest they should overset. So she was 

silent, and, racked with doubts and fears, watched that star of light 


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