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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

At these words Margaret reeled back till the wall of the cabin stayed 

her, and there she rested. 

 

"Spare me your reproaches," went on d'Aguilar hurriedly. "I will tell 

you all the truth. First, be not anxious as to your father; no accident 

has happened to him; he is sound and well. Forgive me if you have 

suffered pain and doubt; but there was no other way. That tale was only 

one of love's snares and tricks----" He paused, overcome, fascinated by 

Margaret's face, which of a sudden had grown awful--that of a goddess of 

vengeance, of a Medusa, which seemed to chill his blood to ice. 

 

"A snare! A trick!" she muttered hoarsely, while her eyes flamed on him 

like burning stars. "Thus then I pay you for your tricks." And in an 

instant he became aware that she had snatched a dagger from her bosom 

and was springing on him. 

 

He could not move; those fearful eyes held him fast. In another moment 

that steel would have pierced his heart. But Betty had seen also, and, 

thrusting her strong arms about Margaret, held her back, crying: 

 

"Listen, you do not understand. It is I he wants--not you; I whom he 

loves, and who love him, and am about to marry him. You he will send 

back home." 

 

"Loose me," said Margaret, in such a voice that Betty's arms fell from 

her, and she stood there, the dagger still in her hand. "Now," she said 

to d'Aguilar, "the truth, and be swift with it. What means this woman?" 

 

"She knows best," answered d'Aguilar uneasily. "It has pleased her to 

wrap herself in this web of conceits." 

 

"Which it has pleased you to spin, perchance. Speak, girl!" 

 

"He made love to me," gasped Betty; "and I love him. He promised to 

marry me. He sent me a letter but to-day--here it is," and she drew 

it out. 

 

"Read," said Margaret; and Betty read. 

 

"So _you_ have betrayed me," said Margaret, "you, my cousin, whom I have 

sheltered and cherished." 

 

"No," cried Betty. "I never thought to betray you; sooner would I have 

died. I believed that your father was hurt, and that while you were 

visiting him that man would take me." 

 

"What have you to say?" asked Margaret of d'Aguilar in the same dreadful 

voice. "You offered your accursed love to me--and to her, and you have 

snared us both. Man, what have you to say?" 

 

"Only this", he answered, trying to look brave, "that woman is a fool, 

whose vanity I played on that I might make use of her to keep near 

to you." 

 

"Do you hear, Betty? do you hear?" cried Margaret with a terrible little 


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